Tag Archives: employee retention

No Joy in Dirtville: The Rangers Lose Steam, Could Your Employees Run Out of Gas, Too?

I’m not really a sports fan but I got a little excited last week when it looked like the Rangers were about to win their first World Series. That was a heart-breaker, not being able to come back in that final game and git’er done.

Hence, my title “No Joy In Dirtville.” We haven’t had enough rain this year to be Mudville.And it wasn’t mighty Casey striking out, it was just lackluster performance. The 6th game just seemed to suck it all out of them and they couldn’t shake it.

Be aware of something similar happening to your employees. On those days when the customers have been especially tough on them or when they are just having a day where nothing goes right, it may be that the next day or two could be less productive for them. As a manager, just like Wash, you need to find a way to keep it from getting your team down.

It can get particularly dicey around performance appraisal time. This once a year data dump that should have been parceled out over the last 12 months can lower morale like nobody’s business if poor performance marks come as a big surprise. Can you imagine how productive you would be after being told that the past year of your life has been a series of mistakes and mediocre work even though nothing was said before this?

Nobody likes to tell someone they aren’t doing it right, but as managers we need to find ways to coach our teams to better work habits and higher skill levels. This can’t be done once a year, it has to come to your employees all the time so they can make those little course corrections.

At the end of 12 months you would be amazed at the road your staff can be on if they are guided throughout the year.

Customer Service R&R: Metrics and Rewards & Recognition

90% (of) Employees say customer experience is very important or critical in their company’s strategies
31% (of) Employees say company recognized or rewards employees for improving the experience.
from How to Build a Customer-Centric Culture

That’s quite a contrast. What it tells me is that most customer service employees want to provide a good customer experience but that little in the way of incentive comes their way for doing so. Since people generally do what they are incented to do it might be time to investigate what your employees are being incented to do.

Take a look at the metrics that are measured in your customer service center. Do they encourage staying with the customer until everything is fixed? Or do they encourage hanging up as soon as possible? Do you measure metrics that let employees know that customer experience is top of mind or do you measure performance by how many calls the employees can take in an hour?

The metrics you measure tell employees what your expectations and priorities are. This means any rewards and recognition tied to those metrics guide where they put their efforts on behalf of your company. Be certain that what you are rewarding is the behavior and performance that meets your stated goal of making a customer-centric customer experience, not one of efficiency at all costs.

It may cost customers.